Dealing with Cluster Headaches

Dealing with Cluster Headaches

Dealing with Cluster Headaches

A rare and not life-threatening type of headache experienced by most people is the cluster headache, which is also one of the most painful headache types. They can occur in the eye, or around it, on one side of your head, and may be strong enough to wake you up at night. They may often occur frequently in what are called “cluster periods,” which may last anywhere from a few weeks to several months.

What Are Symptoms of Cluster Headaches?

Cluster headaches tend to come on quickly, with no warning signs beforehand. Occasionally, one might experience an aura or nausea, as one might experience with a migraine. Typically, though, you’re likely to experience:

How Long Can a Cluster Period Last?

Cluster headaches do not always persist for cluster periods and, in fact, experience cluster headaches in episodes, which occur for anywhere from a week to a year. This may be followed by a period of remission, with no pain for up to another year.

The typical length of a cluster period is between several weeks and several months. In some cases, the date the period starts and the overall duration can be consistent, sometimes even seasonally. A few things to note about cluster periods:

When Should You Speak to Your Doctor About a Cluster Headache?

If you’re experiencing cluster headaches in any way and for any duration, it’s safest to check with a doctor to ensure that there is no other outside cause or disorder, and to discover the best treatment. Seek emergency care if  you have:

If you have an existing history of headaches, you should also consult with a physician if the headaches feel different or if the pattern of your headaches has changed.

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