Welcome in Spring with Exercise

With warmer weather comes the desire to stop the hibernating and get up and move. It’s a healthy instinct; it is recommended to get 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity physical activity. Two days a week, you should do muscle-strengthening activities. Not only will these exercises make you feel better, and keep you healthy, but they’ll help instill good habits. Combined with good eating and hydration, spring exercise can help you ring in a whole new you.

Tricep Dips

Your upper body is a good place to start, and these dips, as the name suggests, help strengthen your tricep. Start at a sitting position and place your palms on the surface (park bench, countertop, back of your couch), and step forward, as though you’re hovering, held up by your palms. Then lower your body, making sure your elbows don’t bend any more than 90 degrees. Then left yourself back up. Dipping down and rising up is a single rep. Do this eight to ten times

Plank Hold

For your core, trying a plank hold is a good solution, helping to strengthen your back muscles and your belly muscles. It is also very good for the arms and legs. Put your arms on the floor, without locking your elbows.

Squats

Trying out squats with rotation lets you concentrate on your lower body. The first step is standing up straight with your feet apart at shoulder-width and bending your knees, lowering your bottom toward the ground. You then stand up, slightly twisting your body to one side, then squat again, and when coming back up, rotate to the other side.

 

Activities

Beyond specific exercises like these, you can do all kinds of simple physical activities to get your exercise in. You can swim, go for a simple walk, or even join a group that does a physical activity together. Find a public garden or a state or national park to visit, and see as much of it as you can. Why not combine the majesty of nature with a little cardio? If you want a little extra spring fun, take these three exercises and do them in between spring cleaning.

Summary

However you exercise, don’t push yourself in an unhealthy way. You can consult with your doctor on what is the right kind of exercise for you. You don’t want to push yourself so hard you injure yourself – just enough that you work on strengthening the parts of your body that need it, especially with all the physical activity spring asks of you.

Author
Maryland Pain & Wellness

You Might Also Enjoy...

MRIs and CT Scans - Getting to the Root of Severe Headaches

Severe headaches can be debilitating, affecting every aspect of life from work to relationships. When over-the-counter painkillers fail to provide relief, it's crucial to delve deeper into the underlying causes. MRIs (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) and CT...

Five Potential Signs of a Hernia

Hernias can be sneaky, often manifesting without much warning until they become problematic. A hernia occurs when an organ pushes through an opening in the muscle or tissue that holds it in place. While some hernias may not cause any symptoms...

Occupational Therapy for CRPS

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a challenging condition characterized by intense and chronic pain, often affecting the limbs. Coping with CRPS demands a comprehensive approach, and occupational therapy (OT) plays a pivotal role in managing...

Physical Therapy for Neuropathic Pain

Neuropathic pain, characterized by tingling, numbness, and shooting sensations, can significantly diminish one's quality of life. While medications offer relief for some, they often come with side effects and may not address the root cause.
Five Chest Pain Causes That Aren't Heart Related

Five Chest Pain Causes That Aren't Heart Related

Experiencing chest pain can be alarming, often conjuring immediate concerns about heart-related issues. While chest pain can indeed be a symptom of cardiac problems – and its important to take those concerns seriously...

Electrical Nerve Stimulation for Back Pain

In a world where chronic back pain affects millions, finding effective and non-invasive solutions is crucial. Traditional treatments like medications and physical therapy often provide relief, but emerging technologies offer a promising alternative...