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What is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome? When Should I See A Doctor?

According to research, nearly six percent of adults suffer from carpal tunnel syndrome and is the most commonly diagnosed nerve compression neuropathy. Symptoms often begin with a tingling and numbing feeling in your hand which is because of pressure on the median nerve that extends from the arm to the carpal tunnel passage of the wrist. The job of the median nerve is to control your hand’s movement and sensation in the fingers (excluding the pinky finger). Because swelling narrows the scope of your mobility, it affects the function and feeling of the hand.

What Causes Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

There are different indicators as to what causes carpal tunnel as medical conditions, employment duties, and lifestyle choices can all contribute to common symptoms. Medically, patients who are obese, have arthritis, hypothyroidism, pregnancy, hand or arm trauma, and diabetes have a higher probability of getting this illness. People who work in jobs that require hand and wrist motion repetition like assembly, administration, bakers, textiles, or musicians are also at risk.

Women are also three times more likely than men to receive a diagnosis because the carpal tunnel is much smaller than males. If women experience carpal tunnel during pregnancy, symptoms will generally diminish within a couple months of birth. Otherwise, the symptoms of carpal tunnel can last long-term. The best opportunity for treatment is an early diagnosis.

When Should I See A Doctor?

Your first experience might be paresthesia, or your hand ‘falling asleep.’ You could also experience it during the night when your body is in a more relaxed position. When you awake, you may also experience the symptoms all the way to your shoulder area. If you experience numbness, itching, tingling, or burning in the palm of your hand, you should make your doctor aware. You will also experience the same sensations in your thumb, index, or middle fingers.

Can Symptoms Worsen?

Yes, your symptoms can worsen as carpal tunnel syndrome advances and becomes more severe. You will experience less strength in your hand which you will notice in your grip because the muscles have begun to shrink. At this time, you will experience muscle cramps and elevated levels of pain as your median nerves lose their primary function. As the pressure and irritation intensify, a patient will experience loss of feeling, reduced nerve impulse, and less ability to coordinate. You will also lose your strength in your wrist and digits which will affect mobility. If you put off a doctor’s visit, you could experience irreparable muscle damage and function.

How Does Maryland Pain & Wellness Center Test And Treat Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

It is vital that Dr. Achampong first perform an examination to diagnose your condition properly. Along with a hands-on approach to diagnosis, it may be necessary to perform an EMG-NCV to measure the nerve functioning in the carpal tunnel area. Once we know you have carpal tunnel, we will customize a treatment plan that may include a lifestyle change, a splint, medication, or surgery. We will also recommend exercises that will help you align your wrist and positioning.

Please visit us at https://marylandpainandwellnesscenter.com/locations/ to schedule an appointment, get directions to our office, or send a consultation email to our staff.

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