What to Do for Self-Care of Neck Pain

What to Do for Self-Care of Neck Pain

What to Do for Self-Care of Neck Pain

Neck pain can come from many sources, such as arthritis in the spine, spasms, muscle strains, a bulging disc and more. If the pain is chronic or severe, you should consult a physician, but if you’re prescribed home care, there are a few methods that are recommended for treating neck pain.

Change Your Neck Routine

Ok, sure, no one thinks about what their neck is doing in a daily basis, but if you change how you move about daily, you might find a change in your neck pain. This could be a matter of doing less throughout the day, while also staying active enough, but to not make the pain worse. Bed rest is not generally recommended for neck pain.

There are a few typical recommendations to look at when experiencing neck pain, in terms of changing your activities:

Exercise the Pain Away

Once the period of limited movement has passed, your physician or physical therapist may recommend some exercises geared toward reducing the pain you are experiencing in your neck. Exercise is intended specifically to strengthen the neck, help your posture and generally improved the flexibility of your neck. The exercises for neck pain are relatively simple:


How Can You Avoid Neck Pain?

Much of the advice geared toward prevention of neck pain revolve around increasing flexibility, and moving to break periods of stagnancy.

Summary

The good news is that there are plenty types of neck pain for which the solutions are very simpler, and it’s simpler still to avoid many typical types of neck pain. Always be sure to consult with your doctor if you’re trying anything out of the ordinary to work on reducing your neck pain.

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